Buddhism, Mindfulness, Zen, Zen practice

Finding a Fidget Spinner

If you see a spider scurrying right at you, what do you do?

If you are walking down the street and you find a fidget spinner sitting on the ground, what do you do?

If you take the fidget spinner and someone asks you if you took it, what do you say?

These are important questions!

Buddha said that to stop killing anything that is living is the right thing to do.

Buddha said that to stop taking things that are not given to us is the right thing to do.

So, even if you find a toy and take it, still it is stealing because nobody gave it to you.

We want to stop killing living things.  We want to stop taking things that are not given to us.  We want to stop telling lies.

These are the right things to do.

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Buddhism, Mindfulness, Zen, Zen practice

Don’t Start Yelling

If I started yelling at you right now, you might get scared, or mad.  You might duck down, run away, or start yelling back at me.

The way I talk, and the way you talk, to people, or to animals, really affects them, and us.  Buddha told us to look at the way that we cause things.  What do we cause when we lie, or yell at someone, or say mean things, or talk about other people behind their backs?   We cause trouble and confusion, and hurt feelings.  How we talk is one of the most important things we can look at, be aware of.

All we want to do in our life is to help people, and cause more love and positively in the world.  We can do that every day, in every way, with how we talk.  Buddha called that Right or Wise Speech.

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Personal Ethics, Self Help, Self-Awareness, Spiritual Practice

Come Into the Light

I believe that when we move along in life, we realize that treating ourselves and those around us with kindness, consideration, and compassion becomes the very point of living.  Not only does this type of awareness and behavior make our existing life happy, but it will come to play at the end of life.  Regret and remorse over what we did, and did not do, to and for ourselves, and to and for others, weighs heavy.  It makes our departure all that much harder.

We talk about people’s demons: these inner monsters hold the reins to self-centered, inconsiderate, hurtful, and inhumane behavior.  These demons are nothing other than manifestations of hurt, anger, and self-loathing.  We do anything to deny, divert, mask, and avoid facing our hidden pain.  To get in touch with these forces of destruction, we have to look at our own hurt, to begin with.  It is deep-seated, unconscious, you might say.  To heal, we have to go deep and bring up this pain and hurt to the surface, to the light.  We do this by examining–inquiring into–every single thought that arises in our mind.  By doing this, we begin to see what kinds of thoughts occupy our everyday mind and drive our words and actions.  We get in touch with our hurt, from childhood (when virtually every person we encounter can either lift us to our potential or damage our psyche and soul by the manifestation of their own hurt) and all ensuing encounters throughout our life.

Meditation, counseling, and a spiritual path are tools (guides) for diving to the bottom of self.  When we deny and fail to know and take responsibility for our own mind, we are driven by the unconscious manifestations of hurt, and then anger, and then destructive words and actions.  This cycle creates more and more self-loathing, and suffering-for ourselves and everyone around us.

There may be nothing more frightening than looking deeply into our own personal darkness.  When we lack that courage, though, the demons from the darkness most certainly drive our life.  We have a choice.  It is a personal thing.  No one can make us do anything.  It’s up to us.  Every single moment of every single day we live with ourselves, within our own minds.  The path of self-awareness takes ultimate courage.  We make the workings of own minds as conscious and transparent as we can.  When we are able to do this, we are living our own lives.  Otherwise, we are victim to everything everybody has ever said or done to us, and to the things that happen beyond our control.

Live a conscious life.  Live a true life.  Live your own life.

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Buddhism, Zen, Zen practice

The Intention to Not Hurt

I do not like to kill cockroaches.  I try to not kill them, because I know that they have a life, too, just like me.  They have the same life.  They deserve to live as much as I do.  My intention–what I want to do, what I plan to do–is never to kill another cockroach.  But when they come into my house, I do spray them with poison, because they carry germs and bacteria that could make me, or my wife or my dog sick.  My intention stays never wanting to kill a cockroach.  If I keep that intention, then I might look for other ways to keep cockroaches away.  I could pick them up, in my hand or in a jar, and put them outside.  So, my good intention can make me act in a better way.

Buddha called our not wanting, and trying not to, hurt anyone or anything right, or wise intention.

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Buddhism, Mindfulness, Zen, Zen practice

Turning Wrong View Right

I used to tease my little brother.  It made me happy to get him mad.  The madder, the better.  Even when I got in trouble with my father for teasing, I still felt a little bit happy that I got my brother so mad.  I thought teasing my brother was a good thing to do.   But I also knew inside of me, in my heart, in my gut, that hurting my brother was not right.

With the way I looked at it, I caused pain for those around me.  We can call this wrong view, or a wrong way of looking at it.  When we look at things in ways that cause pain and trouble, for ourselves and others, that separates us from others, we need to change our wrong view to right view.

We can say wrong and right, but right doesn’t mean that we are more and someone else is less.  Right means that we are being real, we understand how life works.  We know how to bring people together, which makes everyone feel whole and safe, and more loving.

When we do selfish things, we are looking at it wrong.   We need right view.  When we forget that we are connected to everyone and do things that cause others to feel bad, we need right view.

Right view follows Buddha’s Four Eight.  Four noble truths and all of the steps on the Noble Eightfold Path.  Understanding this about Buddha’s Path is Right View, Right Understanding.

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Buddhism, Mindfulness, Zen, Zen practice

Putting Down Roots

On August 6, I begin my sixth year teaching the Dharma to children (and their parents and grandparents) at Daifukuji Zen Temple in Kona.  The Dharma is Buddha’s teaching.  To me, this is not an exercise in religiosity.  (Religion was not Buddha’s intention.)  I am teaching children to become aware, to wake up, to themselves, to their own minds and hearts.  I believe to the core of my being that self-awareness, taught by Buddha and many others, is salvation.  In the realm of my Zen practice, the more aware we become, the more open, loving, kind, tolerant, flexible, wise, and beneficial we are.

I took Zen priest vows in 1984 and in 1990.  As one of my teachers told me, “You have vowed to dive to the bottom of the ocean of self.”  My vow also is to take and give guidance in Buddha’s example and his teaching (the Dharma), and in the community of those who practice self-awareness.

I teach the Dharma to kids who are toddlers, up to high schoolers.  Most are in the middle, four to twelve.  I try to make my lessons relatable, and i read picture books at the end of my talks, ideally running along the same themes as my presentations.  Not every child understands what I’m talking about.  But, as I have discussed with Daifukuji’s head priest, Jiko Nakade Sensei, we are putting down roots.  What the children see, hear, are exposed to, and experience during our Family Services will blossom someday into self-aware, loving, compassionate and wise human beings.  We need those people in our world.

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